Are You in the Game or Just Watching?

Share this article

I confess I am not a football fan. I don’t watch the games; I don’t know all the teams.

But guess where I’ll be Sunday night. With my husband beside me and my chicken wings and nachos in front of me? You’ve got it – I’ll be right there with the rest of America watching the Super Bowl.

I was thinking about this obvious incongruity and I realized there’s a great lesson here for anyone who wants Super Bowl-style visibility. More on that in a minute!

The Super Bowl has become the biggest televised event in the country, attracting more viewers than anything else on TV. Like me, millions of those watching won’t care a whit about who wins or loses. We want to hear opera soprano Renee Fleming sing “The Star-Spangled Banner;” to see Bruno Mars and the Red Hot Chili Peppers in the halftime show; and, yes, to be delighted by those $8 million-a-minute commercials.

But, despite the fact that several studies indicate half of us don’t care about the game, from a PR perspective, it’s important to understand the game is what’s driving this marketing spectacle. The game is the content. And what I tell anyone who wants visibility for their business, product or book is, you’ve got to be the content.

When you’re providing valuable content for the media, you stand a good chance of creating a Super Bowl moment for yourself.

Darnell Jones, a past client of ours, had his. He’s a surgical supplies salesman who came to us about a year ago with a product he’d developed: His TUKZ boxer briefs attach to the hem of the wearer’s shirt and keep it neatly tucked in all day.

It was Darnell’s first-ever product and, while he said he didn’t know a lot about PR, he knew he needed to get the word out about TUKZ if he wanted to sell them.

“If no one knows about them,” he said, “they’re only as good as the thought in my mind or the product in a warehouse.”

Darnell signed on for a print campaign, which started strong. We wrote an article quoting him about trends in men’s undergarments (content!). It was published by Examiner.com and an Examiner reporter interviewed him for yet another story. He got a mention and photo on Thrilllist.com, and requests for product samples from more than 30 prominent publications.

What happened next surprised even us.

We sent out a second article, and this one caught the attention of a fashion blogger.

She just happens to be a regular contributor to NBC’s Today show. The next thing we knew, Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford were holding up Darnell’s underpants before 5 million-plus viewers and calling them “clever.”

Super Bowl moment!

One of our current clients is enjoying her Super Bowl moment even as I write. Make that moments.

Dr. Jaime Kulaga has a bachelor’s in psychology, and master’s and doctorate degrees in counseling. She wanted to get publicity for her new book, Type “S”uperWoman: Finding the LIFE in Work-Life Balance, but despite her impressive credentials and appealing topic, the first publicist she approached told her, “I can’t take you on as a client because no one knows who you are.”

We’re so glad Jaime didn’t give up – and she is, too!

Glamour magazine (yeah – that Glamour magazine) made her the sole source of an article about reducing stress during the holidays. Yahoo! Shine published her list of “top reasons why saying ‘no’ can be a good thing.” She has yet another interview scheduled with Glamour, and two more with Self and Prevention magazines. Essence magazine was one of the many publications that requested a copy of her book.

Here are two people who weren’t celebrities but thought they had something new that would benefit others. They didn’t know whether the media would be interested in them, but they also knew they’d definitely never score if they didn’t get out on the playing field.

Do you want your own Super Bowl moment? Is there something keeping you from getting out on the playing field? Over the years I’ve talked with people who expressed concern that they weren’t well-known enough or that what they had to offer wasn’t valuable enough for mass media exposure. In almost 100 percent of those cases, it just wasn’t true.

If you have concerns like this – talk to us. We can help evaluate your message and advise you on the best publicity options. We want to see you in the game!

Time for kick-off!
Marsha

Share this article

Subscribe to the PR Insider.

Sign up for the PR Insider Newsletter to receive weekly publicity tips to get you featured in the print publications and on TV and radio.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.