The Time And Toil That Lie Behind ‘Instant’ Media Success

The Time And Toil That Lie Behind ‘Instant’ Media Success

Have you ever heard actors or singers who became “overnight sensations” explain that their success didn’t happen overnight after all? Instead, it was the result of lots of toil, along with years in which they languished in obscurity before – after much persistence – they rose to prominence and finally achieved “instant” fame. Building your personal brand works in somewhat the same way. You can’t expect to bolt out of the starting gate one day and end up the next morning on the front page of a major newspaper or on the set of a national TV show. So, the bad news is that success in the publicity and personal-brand-building world can take time. The good news is, for those willing to put in that time and effort, success does happen – and often in a big way! Case in point: One of our clients was just featured in an Inc. magazine article that focused entirely on her and her message, along with a mention of her book! That’s not a common occurrence with this publication. But this was no overnight achievement. She’s been our client for a year, and in that time we steadily helped her build both a stronger social media presence and print media presence. Would Inc. magazine have devoted so much space exclusively to her if she hadn’t built her authority over the last 12 months? Unlikely. I share her success story for a couple of reasons. For one thing, this shows what can be accomplished by those who find a message that resonates with the media and who keep at it, realizing that publicity and...
Don’t Ignore The New Names In The Media Landscape

Don’t Ignore The New Names In The Media Landscape

I’ve shared in the past how excited our team gets whenever we score a big media hit for one of our clients. What’s interesting these days is the changing nature of some of those hits. Certainly, the New York Times, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and other traditional print media have always been a part of the mix that sends our enthusiasm into hyperdrive. And they remain so! But, with the rise of digital media publishers, more and more we are seeing and getting excited about names that were unfamiliar not that long ago, yet reach audiences that rival — or even surpass — those time-honored media giants. Maybe you’re familiar with a few of them. Refinery29. The Verge. BroBible. Ladders. Or maybe you’re not -– because I wasn’t until recently! But if you’re still old-school in your media orientation — and are concentrating only on established media for your publicity efforts — it’s time to re-think your universe. These digital publications are fast becoming too big to ignore, and they can play a significant role in promoting your brand. Let me offer three reasons why you should be thrilled if one of them wants to interview you and share your expertise with the world: Social media sharing. The readers of these digital publications love to share on social media articles that catch their fancy — and that means your appearance in one of them has the potential to gain exposure that gets multiplied several times over. Let me tell you about one recent real-world example. We arranged for one of our clients to be included in a...
Writing Op-Eds Vs. Being A Journalist’s Source

Writing Op-Eds Vs. Being A Journalist’s Source

When it comes to the print media, there’s more than one way to get your message out and to position yourself as an authority. Some of our clients want to be the go-to expert for journalists who are in need of well-credentialed sources for their articles. Others long to write opinion articles – or op-ed pieces, as they are commonly referred to – where they can more fully express their views on trends, breaking news or life in general. Many want to do both! So is one better than the other? Well, each has its advantages, so let’s take a look at that. With an op-ed piece, you have the opportunity to give your complete point of view, as opposed to a reporter picking and choosing a few highlights from an interview with you. It’s definitely an option when it comes to positioning yourself as a thought leader in whatever field of endeavor you want to be viewed as an expert. On the other hand, when you’re quoted in a news or feature article – especially with a highly respected publication – the readers recognize that the journalist trusted your expertise enough to turn to you as a source. You’re offering insight and maybe even giving your opinion, yes, but in this case you are getting the added bonus of an implied endorsement from that journalist, who essentially is saying to his or her readers that you’re someone who brings experience and knowledge to the topic under discussion. Some people prefer the op-ed, perhaps because they assume there’s a certain distinction that comes with these bylined pieces. Plus, they...
How Patience Pays Off When Trying To Grab The Media’s Attention

How Patience Pays Off When Trying To Grab The Media’s Attention

Sometimes media opportunities emerge quickly after you pitch journalists with a great story idea. Often, though – especially with the print media – those opportunities take time and the fruits of your labor may not reveal themselves until days, weeks or even months after you send out your pitch. We experienced a remarkable example of one of those “takes-time moments” recently when a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reached out to us with a surprising request. She wanted to speak with one of our clients for an article we wrote for her campaign that examined how to talk to parents who are grieving the loss of a child. The journalist remembered receiving our pitch a year ago, about what to say to grieving parents. So she searched her email and, sure enough, there it was, ready to lead her back to us and our client. Now, it just so happens that this particular client’s contract with us ended about eight months ago. Even so, we didn’t hesitate to arrange the interview. We were happy that the interview went so well for our client as she was featured prominently in the article that appeared in the Journal-Constitution. But it didn’t end there! Over the next several days other publications picked up the article. A week later that was still happening, with the Boston Herald joining those that had published the piece. It was a big win all around, all because of a year-old pitch! This particular incident brings to mind a couple of things worth remembering when you’re out there trying to grab the media’s interest and worrying that all...
What Makes You An Ideal Candidate For Publicity?

What Makes You An Ideal Candidate For Publicity?

Here’s a question you might have asked yourself as you decide whether to take the plunge and embark on a PR campaign: How do I know if I qualify for the media spotlight? If you aren’t someone the media is already beating down the doors to interview, you can get them to look your way if you have the right qualities and characteristics that will give them the assurance that you’re someone worth their time. But just what are those qualities and characteristics? Let me share a few that I think make someone the ideal candidate to have a successful publicity campaign: A book. One of the best ways to build your authority is to write a book. This can give you a leg up on others in your field because not only can you talk about the same things as your competitors, but you literally wrote the book on the subject! Some people try to beg off this one, saying they struggle to write a short essay, so an entire book is out of the question. Relax. That’s where topnotch ghostwriters come into the picture and can do the job for you. Do you absolutely need a book to have a successful PR campaign? No, but it immediately communicates your authority which helps immeasurably with gaining entry to the media. Credentials. When we choose to take on a client, what we look for is that your credentials are in line with your message. The media must be able to trust that you know your subject and credentials are the primary qualifiers they use. They will be skeptical of...
What The Oscars Can Teach Us About Rebounding From A Mistake

What The Oscars Can Teach Us About Rebounding From A Mistake

A year ago the people in charge of the Academy Awards flubbed it – badly. As nearly everyone knows, the cringe-worthy moment came when someone handed presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway the wrong envelope, causing them to announce La La Land as the Best Picture winner, when the Oscar actually belonged to Moonlight. Oh, my! It was quite an embarrassing – and humbling – moment for everyone involved. Add the fact that nearly 33 million people were watching and you had a broadcast gaffe of gargantuan dimensions. Had most of us been in that situation, we would have wanted to slink away, never to be seen again! But the folks behind the Academy Awards didn’t slink away. Quite the contrary! At this year’s Oscars, they dealt with the PR debacle head on, owning up to what happened while still giving the audience what it always tunes in for – fabulous gowns and heartfelt acceptance speeches, with a little music and comedy mixed in. Hopefully, in your efforts to promote your brand, you’ve never experienced a media misadventure that’s anywhere near the equivalent of last year’s Oscars. But many of us who have appeared on TV, been interviewed on radio or talked with a newspaper reporter certainly have had a few moments we would like to get back. Maybe you were asked a tough question you didn’t expect and stammered out an inadequate response. Perhaps you were unprepared for the detailed questions the interviewer posed, making you seem less authoritative on the subject than you really are. Or maybe nerves got the better of you and you drew a...